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Work Shop Cast K.A.N. Beta WIP; GK Model recast
Topic Started: Jul 29 2017, 07:39 PM (1,838 Views)
Monsterist76
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My first resin kit, my first WIP.

It wasn't so long ago that I considered the prospect of building a resin kit very daunting and way beyond my capabilities. But a few models later, with more experience under my belt and after a little research, I decided to take the plunge.

The original version of this kit by Workshop Cast could be considered one of my "Holy Grail" kits. If any kit was going to make me get into resin, it would be this one. The original, however, is expensive and hard to find so I decided to buy a cheaper recast from GK Model after hearing good things about them here on GundamEclipse. Also, with this being my first resin kit, it probably wouldn't be wise to spend a lot of money on an original that I could potentially mess up while I learn the ropes. Of the same token, I decided against wasting time and resources on building another kit to practice working with resin. I would rather get straight to building what I really want.

For anyone not familiar with this kit, it is 1/100 scale (considerably bigger than 1/100 Gundam) and is a Mortar Headd from The Five Star Stories.

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Here is a short 360 view turntable video of the kit nicely finished: https://youtu.be/jAp_8nOjYWo


The kit came with a photocopy of the original instructions which I used to check I had been supplied with all the parts. Reference pictures of the painted kit were also supplied. After the parts check, I soaked them overnight in a sugar soap solution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_soap. I couldn't find Purple Power or Simple Green here in the UK. Sugar soap is a degreaser so hopefully it got rid of any residual mold release agent. It had no adverse effect on the resin. I opted to bathe the parts first because I had heard that doing so after sanding the resin can result in the residual mold release being worked into the porous surface of the resin during the sanding process. Better to be safe than sorry, I thought. I will give the parts another clean in dish washing liquid prior to priming.

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I am very pleased with the quality of GK Models recast. With this being my first resin kit, I have no point of comparison, but all the detail in the sculpt is accurately and clearly reproduced with next to no flash.

Sculpt/recast detail:
Spoiler: click to toggle


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Again, these parts haven't been cleaned up yet (bar a couple of tabs on the collar). Here I am just highlighting not only the detail in the original sculpt but also the accuracy in which that detail has been reproduced in the recast.


My plan is to thoroughly clean up all the parts before starting any pinning. This entails sanding the resin smooth, de-nubbing, reshaping and resculpting where necessary, fixing surface defects (pinholes etc.) and re-scribing panel lines.

Here, the pattern along the edge of the part had resulted in the corresponding surface on the other side to be uneven. I used Mr Surfacer 500 to fill the surface and restore the evenness. You can also see some mishaps with my early attempts at re-scribing that also needed filling :)

Spoiler: click to toggle



Some of the parts are very thin in some areas. Here, on the front skirt, I have gone right through the resin while re-scribing the panel line. No biggie, easy fix.

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Something learned from ingenhk's Vatshu build was to use CA glue mixed with talcum powder to restore uneven edges (more of this to follow). The technique has worked really well. I have already used it numerous times in various applications (filling pinholes, re-sculpting).

Here I used the mixture to add a half mm to one edge of the shield so the distance between the outer edge and the adjacent "vent" detail is the same as the other side.
Spoiler: click to toggle

All cleaned up and ready for primer:
Spoiler: click to toggle



There's still lots of clean up of the parts to do. I am very satisfied with the quality of the recast but there are many minor defects that need amending. I anticipate this initial clean-up stage taking a long time. Once that is done, I can shift focus to the next stage - pinning and test-fitting.

No need for a clean, tidy workspace in this stage of the build. It's a messy business.

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Edited by Monsterist76, Jul 29 2017, 08:50 PM.
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ingenhk
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So, what about that large plate on the back, is it very thin?
It's the only part on this cast that is troubling me. It's also the part that stopped Squee's progress.
Edited by ingenhk, Jul 30 2017, 01:42 AM.
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Monsterist76
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ingenhk
Jul 30 2017, 01:41 AM
So, what about that large plate on the back, is it very thin?
It's the only part on this cast that is troubling me. It's also the part that stopped Squee's progress.
It's pretty thin in some areas but it doesn't overly concern me. It will require some heating and bending into shape. Mainly on the outer points where the resin has curled up a little. I will bend them so there is an even flow of the curvature across the whole part. The two prongs at the top will require some sanding so their length and thickness is symmetrical. I have started that process but they still need more work.

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At first, I thought these were pinholes. There are, like, three or four on the outer surface:

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They are actually due to the detail of the panels on the other side. The thinness of the resin in those areas has caused a hole to go right through. It's no big deal and can be easily fixed.

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Overall, I don't anticipate the part giving me any major problems (fingers crossed) :unsure:

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electric indigo
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Kan is a great design, so it's nice to see you started a WIP.

What scares me away from starting my kit is the prospekt of masking & painting all the little squares on the armor.
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Monsterist76
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electric indigo
Jul 30 2017, 02:14 PM
Kan is a great design, so it's nice to see you started a WIP.

What scares me away from starting my kit is the prospekt of masking & painting all the little squares on the armor.
I'll just hand paint all those after laying down the black for the armour, along with the various emblems on the kit. I'll give them a white base coat first so the orange really pops. Your right, masking them all would be a pain.
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Monsterist76
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Restoring uneven edges using a CA glue + baby powder paste.

There are a couple of edges on the kit that are uneven and kind of chipped.

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The quick, easy solution, of course, would be to just sand back the edge until a smooth, consistent line is achieved, but this would result in the loss of the intended shape and dimensions of the part. Instead, I used the CA/baby powder mixture to restore the edge. If traditional putty was used for this purpose, it would just crumble away when sanded as the defect is too insignificant to provide sufficient adhesion. The CA paste is more resilient but still perfectly sandable.


Credit goes to ingenhk for first bringing this technique to my attention in his Vatshu build and for also providing additional advice on the method.

The mixture used on the head. Before and after sanding:
Spoiler: click to toggle


I'm relieved that job is done and went to plan. The head is a prominent part of the kit and a focal point. That is one area you don't want to mess up! The head still needs more clean-up but the hard part is done. I sanded the head smooth so I could see how the light reflected off the ridge down the centre and ensure it was straight.

Apparently, there is supposed to be a small line engraved into the front tip of the head.

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However, it was mostly lost underneath a large tab on this recast. I didn't bother trying to preserve what was left of that small line. My priority was to cleanly remove the tab while maintaining the shape of the part. I can always re-scribe it back in. Or I may just leave it out altogether. I haven't decided yet. I guess the lineart will be the deciding factor.




I tried heating and manipulating some warped parts. I held the part in some tongs and dunked only the affected area into boiling water. In this case, a foot.

Comparison of a prepped foot with the other yet to be worked on:

Spoiler: click to toggle


I quickly moved the part to the table and pressed firmly against the flat surface until it had cooled. This took several goes before I was satisfied.

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During clean-up of this part, about a mm of resin broke off the tip at the front of the foot (it's quite sharp and slight) but I was able to restore it with the aforementioned CA/powder paste. Hopefully it holds up. I'll have to be careful of knocking it.
Edited by Monsterist76, Jul 31 2017, 01:41 PM.
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Monsterist76
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Just a quick update. I'm still cleaning up the parts. Getting everything ready for primer before I start pinning and test-fitting. Fixing surface defects, heating and bending warped parts etc.

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No, it's not the bat signal, it's the back plate. It took a lot of work to just get to this stage. The part needed some heating so I could bend certain areas into the desired shape. I didn't want to just submerge it in boiling water as then the whole part would go floppy, probably making the task even harder. Instead, I used a hairdryer on individual areas, making sure everything is even and symmetrical. The surface in one area had sunk slightly, probably due to the thinness there. I heated it and applied pressure from underneath, like panel beating a car, to restore the curvature of the outer surface.

I sanded it with 600, 1000, then 3M Ultrafine to get a sheen to the surface. Here, I am holding it up to the light so I can see how it reflects off the surface and check the evenness of the curvature across the whole part. I'm pretty happy with this. Next, I'll tackle fixing the numerous surface defects on the part.


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Again, I polished the area I had filled here. It makes it easier to check the efficacy of the fill and ensure the surface is smooth and follows the contour of the surrounding resin. I am using a CA/baby powder paste, Mr Surfacer 500 and Mr Dissolved Putty for filling, depending on the situation. The CA paste is great as it dries practically instantly and doesn't shrink but can be harder to sand so is best avoided in awkward, tricky to reach areas.

I'm finding filling is a lot easier with resin than plastic. It's a lot easier to feather the edges of the fill and blend them into the surrounding resin for an even, clean fill. Maybe it's because resin is more porous so the filler doesn't just sit on top of the surface but partially becomes part of it.


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The "belt" of the waist part was rocking side to side when placed on the hip. I boiled it and held it firmly against the hip. Now you can see that it sits flush against it (shown in the circled area).

I also tried boiling the knees to get them to conform to the corresponding surface of the legs.

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Unfortunately, it didn't exactly go to plan. The resin split on one and snapped off on the other. Maybe I didn't boil them for long enough before applying pressure.

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I'll have to try and reinstate the snapped off portion with CA paste, which will be tricky as that area is quite thin and the breakage quite large. Will the CA/powder mixture withstand boiling? - the knees still need some reshaping.

For the other one, I'll probably fill the split in situ after it has already been pinned and glued to the leg.
Edited by Monsterist76, Aug 7 2017, 11:10 PM.
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ingenhk
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>like panel beating a car, to restore the curvature of the outer surface.
Yep for that particular part, I tried heating them but I couldn't get it to bulge along the surface, I'd probably have to fill them like some dent on a car.

Usually I de-nub, boil and pin first before any filling, fixing seam, dents. because during the pinning stage I just like to drop things, scratch them or have to re-boil. So if I had done the filling part already I'll have to redo those.
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Monsterist76
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Will boiling a part after it has been filled cause the filler to disintegrate or fall out? Will a CA/powder mixture used as filler withstand boiling or will it just melt? Thanks.
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ingenhk
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Very likely the different materials would expand at different rate when heated.
I've tried boiling epoxy or CA+powder filled parts, the epoxy one cracked and the CA turned back to white powder.
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Monsterist76
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I never considered that, actually. That I might need to re-boil parts during pinning to aid fitting. I'll bear that in mind. I might need to stop filling at this stage and leave it till after pinning. Thanks for the heads up.
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Monsterist76
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Nothing major to report. Just showing where I am with the clean up.

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All these parts are thoroughly cleaned up and ready for primer (after being pinned, of course). There are still a couple of spots that need filling. I think I will stop filling at this stage incase any parts need to be re-boiled during pinning. I will give the parts a thorough inspection before priming and fix as many defects as possible before any primer touches the kit. Marking defects that will need filling helps to quickly identify them when you come back to them later on.

Here's what still needs cleaning up:

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I don't mean to detract from the quality of the recast - all the detail of the sculpt is present and correct and accurately reproduced but, as is to be expected, it isn't perfect. There are many small defects to fix and clean up.

It's a long, arduous process. Especially with something like this part with lots of intricate detail and no large, easily sandable surfaces.

Spoiler: click to toggle


It took me four hours just to clean up this one part. It still needs some filler in a couple of spots but that can wait till later.



Does anyone know of an effective, reliable way to square off and clean up shallow, recessed edges like the one shown here?:

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It isn't practical to get sandpaper in there. I've just about managed by scraping an X-acto (as shown), using a file or even gently scraping with a mold line scraper but none of these methods seems ideal. I feel like I'm missing a tool best suited to this job.


Asymmetry of the arms

Spoiler: click to toggle


I never noticed it at first. Asymmetry of the arms' outer armour is quite common with Mortar Headds. Indeed, that is the case with this one, but it's interesting how the internal structure, "musculature" and cables/tendons also differ. I imagine it is designed like that because each arm serves a different purpose. The right arm requires more power and force to effectively wield the weapon whereas the left arm, for the most part, is only required to lift the shield, and those differing requirements are reflected in the design.


Re-scribing

I am also re-scribing during this clean up stage. Even if it isn't entirely necessary, I am doing it anyway. It will make the job of panel lining easier later on.

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Having only previously worked on plastic kits, I've never really needed to do much re-scribing. I bought a scriber as it is usually required when working with resin. Initially, I tried Tamiya's scriber but found it unwieldy and ineffective to use. It's probably only good for scoring and cutting pla-plate. I am now using a Madworks 0.15 chisel blade which fits in my X-acto and am getting much better results. I'm not sure if I'm going too deep. I'm trying to keep in mind the fact that there will be multiple coats of primer, paint and topcoat going on top. By going deeper, maybe I can avoid having to re-scribe again after the primer. We'll see.
Edited by Monsterist76, Aug 12 2017, 07:35 AM.
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ingenhk
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>Does anyone know of an effective, reliable way to square off and clean up shallow, recessed edges like the one shown here?

Rough sand paper like 400 should be quite hard, cut a small piece and hold it with tweezers. (for the edges)

btw, these modified screwdrivers, sometimes you just need a flat tip for whatever circumstance. Something the angle of an X-acto blade won't do. I used them to push around epoxy and other stuffs. Like the last Nereid update couldn't be done without them.
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Edited by ingenhk, Aug 10 2017, 07:51 PM.
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Monsterist76
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I saw this on your blog's resin tutorial and have been considering getting some jeweller's screwdrivers and a sharpening stone myself. It is a great idea and, I imagine, a much cheaper alternative to buying a set of purpose-built modelling chisels. There have been a few occasions where a small chisel would've been really handy for removing excess resin. I have managed thus far with an X-acto but it isn't really ideal.

Regarding the sharpening stone; is there any special kind in particular I need to get and will water suffice as a sharpening lubricant or do you use oil? A lot of them are designed for sharpening gardening tools and such. I imagine I will need one with a fine grit for such small implements.
Edited by Monsterist76, Aug 10 2017, 08:33 PM.
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ingenhk
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Something cheap would do, I just used water.
You'll only need to thin down the tip, no need to be precise.
The stone I have came with the generic scribing pin I got from a dollar shop.
I don't know if those generic tools are available to you, hasegawa chisels come with a stone, but it costs.
Edited by ingenhk, Aug 10 2017, 10:19 PM.
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electric indigo
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From the "Favourite Tools" thread:

"I have to share something that goes by the obscure name of Special Shape Diamond File (Square Last Bends)

http://hlj.com/product/WAVHT-425

I picked up this and another with a semi-round profile in a sale and it makes (modeling) life so much easier. All those tricky seams in recessed areas, especially on resin kits, are now easy to deal with.

The files are coarse enough to take away some material if needed, but if you apply them lightly, you get a surface that's easy to finish with a final stroke of fine sandpaper."

One year later and I cannot praise this thing high enough.
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ingenhk
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I should pick one up.
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Monsterist76
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Thanks for the pointers, guys. Here's a better indication of the kind of edge I am referring to, incase it wasn't clear from the photo. I don't know how to draw it on the computer so I drew it the old fashioned way :) . It is the one highlighted in red.

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Sometimes there is a little excess resin or the edge isn't straight. When scraping it with an X-acto, the blade kind of jumps, resulting in a slight jagged edge. I'll make some chisels and maybe get some of those curved files too.


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£6.50 for the lot. Precision screwdrivers as small as 1mm and a sharpening stone. I also got a third craft knife to further minimize the need to keep changing blades, and some 0.6mm galvanised wire for pinning small parts.




Damnit!

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Lesson learned: when test fitting, don't force parts that haven't been softened through boiling.

The part is the armature that connects the shield to the forearm. Maybe I can reattach the broken portion with a small pin and putty the seam. It is the large circular section that will be the main load bearing connection, so providing I make that a strong pinned joint, the breakage hopefully won't be too much of an issue.
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Monsterist76
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I'm still cleaning up parts.

I finally found a use for the Tamiya scriber!...Scoring and cutting an old DVD box to make a sanding stick lol. (I'm not using the Tamiya scriber for rescribing panel lines. It's pretty bad for that purpose).

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Sanding sponges and foam sticks are great but not ideal for flat, straight surfaces and edges. There aren't a great deal of flat surfaces on this kit, but for the few there are, I needed something sturdier than the aforementioned sanding implements, to avoid rounding off edges. I will buy a purpose-built tool but I needed something immediately so thought I'd make one to use in the meantime. The sandpaper is stuck on with double sided sticky tape.

1000 is as low a grit as I've ever needed with plastic kits, but I'm finding that you can get away with lower grits with resin (my Squadron medium sanding stick has never seen so much action ^_^ ). 1000 barely has any effect and just polishes, basically. I ordered some lower grit finishing abrasive for use with this homemade sanding stick, anywhere a sponge/stick won't reach, and for holding in tweezers for those really tight spots.

While I wait for the sandpaper to arrive, and to give me a break from clean-up, I thought I'd do a bit of pinning.

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I drilled right through the waist belt (pictured attached to the abdomen) and will sandwich it between the other two parts. This way I was able to use much longer pins embedded deeper into the parts for maximum strength and stability.

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2mm brass rods were used here so the core of the kit is as strong as possible. I'm also using 1mm and 1.5mm rods for smaller parts and non load-bearing joints.


Here's where I am with the pinning so far:

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I like the Blue Tack method of marking pinning holes but sometimes it will stick to the wrong part. In those cases, I will paint around the first drilled hole to mark the other corresponding part to be drilled.

More pics in the spoiler:
Spoiler: click to toggle


I wouldn't say the pinning thus far has been all plain sailing, but it has gone pretty well. Some of the smaller parts are rather loose but that doesn't really bother me - they will be glued anyway, eventually, and aren't heavy or load-bearing. The most important joints at this stage - the hip through to the chest - are solid. It feels like one piece and it hasn't even been glued yet.

I'm enjoying pinning. Like anything else, it can be frustrating at times, but it's nice to have a break from cleaning parts and to finally be able to see the kit taking shape.
Edited by Monsterist76, Aug 28 2017, 01:52 PM.
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ingenhk
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Another promising pinning.
Couldn't wait to see the legs and front skirt.
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Squee
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Its interesting to see that your kit pretty much has all the issues mine did, despite being from a different caster.
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Monsterist76
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The legs are what I'm dreading pinning the most. The kit is fixed pose but there is 3-4cm of rotation forward and back where the legs connect to the hip, so there is a higher chance of messing up the placement of the legs and posture of the kit. (Here, the leg is just dry fit for illustrative purposes).

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I'm not sure of the best way to proceed. Maybe I could putty the female side of the connection (the square socket) and dry fit the legs in the correct position until the putty cures, resulting in a tighter connection before pinning. Thoughts?

Also, on a side note regarding the legs, I was thinking I could, in theory, just drill right through the hip so both legs are connected with the same long pin. Thus:

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This would provide better strength and stability than pinning each leg separately. The same method could also be used for pinning the feet:

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Edited by Monsterist76, Aug 21 2017, 07:54 AM.
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1 pin through the hip is probably not going to add much strength to the pinning, it would make it more difficult to align both sides.
5mm deep would be good enough for the hip, you'll need a longer pin only when the weight is 'hanging' on the pin, that rarely happen. I've seen the same youtube tutorial, where the guy is building a Punisher-Zambambo thing, he put an inch long, thick pin into a long, thin resin peg for the zambo's arm to fortify the connection, with the pin only sticking like 3mm into the female end. You could imagine that pin would do almost nothing in term of fortifying.
For the claws, you'll need a pin about this long(blue), you'll also need to keep them from rotating, on my LED, I did like you had imagined, I cut a square out of the corner of the male side, lubed it and pressed an impression on the other side with epoxy(tiny blue line).
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Onto the hip.
You could find out the default position by aiming the the side of the square pegs on both sides, then mark it with a pen or something, if you have faith you could just pin them as is. You'll need 2 pins on each side to keep them from rotating(I don't recommend epoxy like the claws here, there is plenty of room for another pin).
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With the ankles pinned flush as well, you should get something like this. I put the heel on the little twinstars mat because I haven't boiled the toe yet.
This is pretty much the default, fsskog would call this bad alignment, which I'm not a subscriber to, I only look for how the line goes, most WSC sculpts look good this way, with a slope on the shin. The shoulders should be leveled, no tilt down or up.
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There's still some leeway, some would prefer to shift it more forward like this.
For this position you would have to stuff the ankle connection a little. This is the furthest I would push before I find it ugly(remember the Kan's big front skirt, more pelvic thrust it would look like it's pregnant.)
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Other references.
Official build and Barber's video
The official one is more leaned back while barber's is more forward.(check the slope on the shin and thigh)
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Tyte's, like the default, is more leaned back
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and barber's, more forward(shin is near vertical)
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Official build and tyte.
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Edited by ingenhk, Aug 21 2017, 10:46 AM.
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Monsterist76
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That was a fantastic post. Many thanks, ingenhk, for the input and selection of reference photos depicting different interpretations of the posture. I really appreciate it.

It helps me to see the subtle differences of the posture, stuff I hadn't previously considered (or noticed), and envision how I would like mine to look. I think I prefer the look of Tyte's and the default alignment. Barber's looks fine but perhaps a little too leaned forward when comparing side by side.

I will probably scrap the idea of single pinning right through the hip if it will give little benefit (and potentially cause further complications).

One more quick question if you don't mind - Do you think it would be best to pin the feet to the ankles first, and then the legs to the hip or vice versa? Maybe it would be best to pin the legs at the hip first, then adjustments can be made to the pinning of the feet as necessary, to ensure they are planted firmly on the ground.
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ingenhk
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For a fix pose kit like this, when I test fitting it, the feet could fit flush to the ankle connection, you could try pinning the ankle flush with a short 1mm rod just enough to hold it in place, then do the hip. If you need to adjust the ankle afterward, you could switch the ankle pin to a 1.5-2mm rod, and drill deeper, that way there will be less hustle.
And in any case, if all of these fail, you could still redo everything with epoxy.
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electric indigo
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I would start with everything fixed in a flexible way (tape or blue tac) and determine the desired position of the feet (distance and angle). Then I'd tape the feet to the ground and build the rest up from there. Knee position is usually easy, so you can pin those first, and then position the pelvis to the feet. On my Berlin, I fixed the legs to the pelvis with a drop of superglue, then after this dried, I drilled two holes throug the upper legs into the pelvis from the outside.
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Monsterist76
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Wow, some more great tips there. Stuff I never would've figured out on my own. I did plenty of research before starting this kit but tutorials usually only cover the basic procedure. These kinds of advanced "tricks of the trade" are only learnt after much experience and aren't the kind of thing you will find with a google search or tutorial.

Many thanks, guys (Y)
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ah559881
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Nice work so far. I'm really off out but not having movable joints. If anything I would add ball joints for the hips I feel like that's the easy was of balancing.
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Ball joints. I never considered that. I guess I would have to add them at the ankles as well. It's an interesting thought but perhaps a little too advanced for my first resin kit. I don't want to run before I can walk :) It's something I'll keep in mind for the future if I'm not satisfied with a kit's default stance.

Thanks for taking a look. Pinning and alignment update coming soon.
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Monsterist76
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Another update.

More pinning and parts allignment

And it was going so well...


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I pinned the shoulder rear armour plates. This is the default position before any adjustment has been made. Note the asymmetry with these parts (illustrated by the red and green lines). You may think that it is supposed to be like that because the left arm (and shoulder) is raised higher but it isn't. Both shoulders are level. I think this is an inherent issue with the kit and isn't necessarily due to warping of parts or other fault of the recast. You can see the exact same issue in this build:

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And even on Barber's build (albeit to a slightly lesser degree). YouTube screengrab:

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After much tinkering (heating and bending, sanding surfaces etc.), I finally improved the issue. It isn't perfect but it's closer to being symmetrical now:

Spoiler: click to toggle


There are things I could do to achieve perfect symmetry, eg. reduce the edge of the adjacent part to allow more movement of the plate to the right, but then I would lose the intended dimensions of that part and it would be different to the other side. This will be a recurring theme with this update.

The actual kit isn't sculpted symmetrically when you start looking carefully. I've finally realised that there's only so much you can do when this is the case. Unless a kit is sculpted digitally and 3D printed, it will never be perfectly symmetrical.

It could drive a guy insane trying to get everything symmetrical. You can fix one aspect and it will throw something else out of whack...and so on and so on. It's a never ending cycle ^_^ . Ideally, I would like to have perfect symmetry, but as long as any discrepancies aren't glaringly obvious, I will be satisfied. Rant over ha ha.

The front skirt was also tricky to align correctly. I heated and filed the portion of the hip it connects to, to adjust the angle. After repeated failed attempts to transfer the first pinning hole using Blue Tack or paint, I ended up using a short piece of rod cut at an angle to mark the drilling location.

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It did the trick. (You'll need some needle nose pliers to retrieve the rod if you try this or you might never get it out again). After pinning the front skirt, it refused to align properly so I glued in a sliver of scrap plastic to force it into the desired position

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Upon closer inspection, I realised that the front skirt was also sculpted asymmetrically. Just heating and bending wouldn't suffice so I sanded down one edge but didn't realise that I was also sanding down the outer lip on the underside. Shown below:

Spoiler: click to toggle


Fortunately, it will literally never be seen - it is covered by the adjacent part. After a lot of tweaking, I achieved a satisfactory result. Please ignore any other misaligned parts in this next shot. They haven't been fixed at this point. Here, I'm just focusing on the front skirt alignment:

Spoiler: click to toggle

I'm fighting a losing battle trying to achieve perfection with an asymmetrical sculpt, but this is close enough for me.


The rest of the front skirt armour pinned. Kinda reminiscent of feathers, right?

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Rear skirt armour pinned:

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The next issue I had was with the shoulder armour plates. OOB, they were clashing with the skirt armour due to warping. You can see that the rear plate can't even be fit flush as it is hitting the side skirt. Click the spoiler for more:

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Here's where I am with the pinning so far:

Spoiler: click to toggle


These parts may still require some minor tweaking. I will see how they are in relation to the arms and legs when I pin those. Alignment will be improved further when the parts are glued in place, but for now, I'm satisfied with this.


Edited by Monsterist76, Aug 28 2017, 10:43 AM.
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